Columns and Blogs

As anyone in the Reliant Center could tell you, the oil and gas industry continues to grow. This year’s attendance of 108,300 broke an Offshore Technology Conference (OTC) record.

All pumps should be tested regularly, but wastewater pumps are at the top of the list because they are especially susceptible to changing system conditions.

This article is part of our ongoing series on The History of Pumps.

Centrifugal pumps have many advantages compared with positive displacement pumps. They have the ability to run all over the curve.

Today’s federal requirements dictate the minimum efficiency of an electric motor, but they do not have any impact on the efficiency of a centrifugal pump.

As any austenitic stainless steel would be, 316 stainless steel is very soft. So how does this stainless steel offer strong protection against cavitation? If it is soft, will the imploding bubbles erode the material?

This article is part of our ongoing series on the history of pumps.

Recently, I received a call from a plant operator in Ohio. He said, “We have a big contract from a customer to supply multiple oil heating systems and have just completed the first unit. It is ready to ship.

This article was written in response to the following question from a reader:

In my opinion, the system curve is the single most important component of the pump selection process. After all, the system curve determines the operating point on a pump’s performance curve.

Pump designers know that designing a complex pump is easier than designing a simple one. Having my own roots in design, I know how tempting it is to add another feature and a tweak to a pump design.

In the February 2010 issue of Pumps & Systems, I discussed my Suction Specific Speed (S) Calculator and its ability to predict the stable range of flow for a particular centrifugal pump.

I received interesting (and challenging) feedback from our readers on “Resonant Frequencies, Part 1” from the July issue of Pumps & Systems.

A reciprocating power pump, as depicted in Figure 1, is a displacement machine. It has characteristics that are different than a centrifugal pump.

In the August 2013 issue of Pumps & Systems, I presented a summer pump quiz about cavitation. This column includes the solutions to the cavitation quiz.

In 2012, I wrote a six-part series on centrifugal pump efficiency. In Part Five, I touched on the importance of the breadth of efficiency and how it can be more useful than the peak best efficiency point (BEP).

Let’s start with the basics: boiling is the vaporization of liquid. In a kitchen, water boils at high temperature—100 C (212 F). These temperatures are at atmospheric pressure, however.

You have probably noticed that three-phase motors can have a varying number of leads exiting the junction box. The most common numbers are three, six, nine or twelve.

Pumps & Systems, July 2013

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