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I had the pleasure of spending a day this week at the Geiger Smith-Koch Mid-Atlantic Pump & Process Equipment Symposium in Aston, Pa.
A beautiful historic house with a white picket fence sitting on the corner of the heart of downtown caught our attention. Shadowing the house was a huge stone water tower. The sign in front . . . “The Pump House.” We immediately went inside to check it out.
As our business continues to thrive in an otherwise struggling economy, the impact of our industry's products and services becomes obvious every time we drink a clean glass of water or fill a car's tank with fuel.
After the AWWA event last week, my family and I decided to spend an extra day in Atlanta and hit the White Water Adventure park. Maybe it was my three-day ACE '08 exposure to all things “pumps” and all things “water,” but while climbing the massive mountains that led to the peaks of the water slides, I found myself wondering . . . “What kind of pumps are getting all that water to the top?”
Our repair shop manager, Jerry, recently got a call from a plant to help solve a continual vibration problem with their end-suction process pump. Jim, the plant maintenance manager, was unhappy when we went to see him.
My September tutorial took a look at the affinity laws and showed why each is able to predict changes in flow, head, and power when there is a change in pump speed or impeller diameter.
Our repair shop manager, Jerry, asked me to accompany him on a trip to a power plant to determine the reason why a pump we had recently rebuilt was cavitating.
Why do those three affinity laws do such a good job of predicting the performance of a centrifugal pump when its rotational speed or impeller diameter is changed?

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