October 2007 Issue

Back in the early seventies, when I was in grad school, our government pledged to convert the U.S. measurement system to the metric system. A popular cartoon at the time showed a lab technician with a box of amputated human feet standing at the door of the supply room. The supply clerk was also holding a box, but his was full of volt meters. The caption was "Trading Feet for Meters." That was almost 37 years ago, and we still have most of those feet! I guess that I could say that we are still "inching" into the metric system.
The SI system is the modern day version of the metric system, and the U.S. gets a lot of grief for not embracing its inherent transportability across international boundaries.
While discharge pH limits vary from region to region, the side effects of discharging outside these limits are the same: possible fines and damage to the environment in some cases.
A new technology provides operating personnel with frequent information for those situations when maintaining pump operation is critical to process integrity.
Two imperatives for many of today's industrial plants are to reduce the cost of operations through the enhancement of rotating equipment reliability and enhanced energy efficiency of pumping systems.
Hundreds of millions of dollars are spent every year repairing and replacing pumps well before they have reached their design life.
The next generation solution for variable speed pumping applications are variable frequency drives (VFDs) with integrated advanced pumping software that solves various control applications without the need for a PLC or separate controller.
With highly reliable electrical systems, protective relays may be called upon to operate very infrequently.
With highly reliable electrical systems, protective relays may be called upon to operate very infrequently.
The service department of a variable frequency drives manufacturer frequently sees the following scenario: A frustrated user calls with what he perceives to be a defective piece of equipment. As the technician begins probing for information, the user's frustration boils over, often with an exclamation along the lines of "what a piece of junk!" As the service technician asks the pertinent questions, the exasperated user relays the details of a drive that is continually tripping on a fault until the user is at the end of his rope, not knowing what to do.
Frequency Hopping Spread Spectrum (FHSS) radio was invented during World War II by the military for communicating information and strategic plans to allied forces in a way that would counter enemy efforts to "jam" or intercept traditional radio communication frequencies.
An examination of two indirect methods of determining pump flow in the field.

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